I’m Nuts About Chestnut, Giorgio Armani Beauty’s New Rouge d’Armani Sheer Lipstick in Chestnut

Published in: Daily Beauty

Giorgio Armani Rouge d'Armani Sheer Lipstick in Chestnut

This would be DOPE with a dark blackish brown smokey eye, methinks.

Giorgio Armani Beauty’s new $34 Rouge d’Armani Sheer Lipstick in Chestnut may not be the most original shade (ya know, it’s a nude peachy brown…), but it still looks slick and feels great.

It’s one of those lipsticks you forget you’re wearing, on account of how lightweight it feels (like a breathy tabby kiss at the witching hour…or really anytime of day).

Oh, and that almost luminescent sheen? Poifect.

I’ve had a little trouble tracking this one down online, so you might want to check with a Giorgio Armani Beauty counter if you’re so inclined.

Giorgio Armani Rouge d'Armani Sheer Lipstick in Chestnut

Giorgio Armani Rouge d'Armani Sheer Lipstick in Chestnut

When It Comes to Burnished Brows and Long-Lasting Formulas, Giorgio Armani Beauty’s Eye & Brow Maestros Give a Command Performance

Published in: Eyes, Giorgio Armani, Makeup

Wearing the new Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestros in 1 Jet Black, 9 Gold and 2 Wenge Wood

Sporting the new Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestros in 1 Jet Black (on my upper lash lines), 9 Gold (lower lash lines) and 2 Wenge Wood (brows)

20-pound tabbyOK, don’t worry. We’re going to get through this. You’re going to put down the 20-pound tabby, and step away carefully…

Not yet! Wait for me to give you this signal [I demonstrate a gesture with my hand].

I know, it’s hard because he’s so soft and cuddly, but you have to trust me on this. He really likes his deep-tissue kitty massage, and if you stop abruptly, he could just go off, and no one wants that.

Alright, are you ready? Don’t worry, it’ll all be over soon, and then you’ll be able to devote your full attention to this thought: shiny eyebrows.

Yup, you heard me. Shiny eyebrows.

Kind of weird, right? You wouldn’t think it would work…but it does when Giorgio Armani Beauty does it.

Unlike most brow fillers, their nine creamy new $34 Eye & Brow Maestros have the slightest hint of a sheen. The sheen is supposed to get brows looking as natural as possible by simulating your hairs’ natural shine (as in the hair on your head!).

Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestro in 1 Jet Black

1 Jet Black

Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestro in 2 Wenge Wood

2 Wenge Wood

Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestro in 9 Gold

9 Gold

Giorgio Armani Beauty Eye & Brow Maestro Swatches from the left: 1 Jet Black, 2 Wenge Wood and 9 Gold

Swatches from the left: 1 Jet Black, 2 Wenge Wood and 9 Gold


(read more…)

Sculpting Cheekbones, One Stroke at a Time: Tom Ford’s New Contouring Cheek Color Duo in Stroked

Published in: Face, Tom Ford Beauty

Tom Ford Stroked Contouring Cheek Color Duo

Wearing Tom Ford’s new Contouring Cheek Color Duo in Stroked ($77) on my cheeks while throwing my best “penetrating gaze…”

As someone who pays both monthly and annual dues to The Society of Chubby Cherub Cheeks, I always get a little hot and bothered when I bump into makeup designed to chisel cheeks, like Tom Ford’s two Contouring Cheek Color Duos ($77 each, eek!), which come complete with naughty names.

Softcore (the darker option) and Stroked (the lighter one) each come with two shades — a darker contouring powder and a lighter powder for highlighting.

I’m currently pretty stoked about Stroked…

Tom Ford Stroked Contouring Cheek Color Duo

Tom Ford Contouring Cheek Color Duo in Stroked

I didn’t expect the darker contouring shade (in Stroked) to look so flat and matte, but when I opened the compact for the first time, I saw a warm peachy reddish shade.

Cool! It looked like a straight-up matte, so I was like, “Haaaay, gurl!” (because I really like matte contouring products). :)

But then, as I buffed and worked it into my skin, I started to see light reflecting particles of reddish pink pearl.

Tom Ford Stroked Contouring Cheek Color Duo

Hmm…

That’s when the mixed feelings started.

On the one hand, I love the rich peachy reddish color and how well it deepens that area just beneath the apples of my cheeks in such a radical retro ’80s way, but I can’t help thinking that a flat matte would’ve been a tad more effective.

Tom Ford Stroked Contouring Cheek Color Duo

To quote the text I just got from my XXL pores, “A matte finish would’ve been bomb!” And it may also have been more forgiving than the pearl, which tends to amplify any dips and depressions on my skin (although not dramatically).

Tom Ford Stroked Swatches
(read more…)

Do You See Yourself Wearing Makeup Into Your 40s (If You’re Under 40), 50s, 60s and Beyond?

Published in: Just For Fun

From a few Christmases ago — my granny touching up her red lipgloss!

I can definitely see myself wearing makeup into my 40s, 50s, 60s and beyond (I’m 39 now and lovin’ it!). It’s such a big part of my everyday life, and I still enjoy it very much. I can’t imagine not wearing it.

I’m sure my style will change as I “grow up,” of course, but I like to think that even when I’m a sassy 60-something surrounded by 18 cats, I’ll still be busting out the big glam fairly often. :D

If, as I grow older, I’m judged for still playing with makeup, I’m perfectly comfortable with that.

How about you, friend? Do you see yourself wearing makeup into your 40s (if you’re under 40), 50s, 60s and beyond? Please leave your answer in the comments below!

Your friendly neighborhood beauty addict,

Karen

Light Trails Los Angeles

Published in: Daily Photo

It’s the light trail, man. It’s where all the lights crossed the Sierra Nevada mountains back before the trains started…

LOL! Sorry, that was crazy talk.

Light trails! — those pictures with the long lines of swirling light that look a little fantastical and science fiction. They’re created by keeping the camera shutter (the “eye” thing that opens to let light into the lens) open longer than usual.

And nowadays you don’t even need a giant fancy camera to create them. A lot of smaller cameras let you adjust the shutter speed (in this case, increasing it up to a full second or longer). I used a point-and-shoot (the Sony DSC-RX100) — actually, my favorite point-and-shoot of all time.

You want to look for the setting on your camera that controls the shutter speed. On my Sony, it’s the “S” setting on the dial.

To get this shot, I set the shutter speed for 20 seconds.

That’s a while, and the key is to keep the camera as still as possible, ideally setting it on a tripod or windowsill (an improv tripod), which is what I did.

Normally, the shutter opens and closes in a fraction of a second, usually a fortieth or sixtieth of a single second, but by leaving it open a full 20 seconds while the camera itself remains still, the static objects in the shot, like the buildings and highways, appear to be still, while the moving objects in the shot, like the lights on the cars, are captured as beautiful trails of light. Everything also appears brighter (making it a great way to capture stars in the night sky).

(Side note: conversely, by setting a quicker shutter speed, like to a thousandth of a second, time appears frozen. That’s how photographers do things like capturing a baseball player’s swinging bat, or a flying hummingbird with wings that aren’t blurred, or capturing a single drop of water, or a certain blogger girl jumping in her dress.

To keep the camera as absolutely still as possible, I also used the two-second timer feature. That way I didn’t even have to press the shutter button, which would have caused the camera to move a little.

I was also sitting in a pitch black hotel room like a psycho creeper, LOL! But there was a method to my madness… I turned off the lights so they wouldn’t interfere with the final pic (I also turned off the camera’s built-in flash).

The end result? Light trails of LA cars on the freeway!

Page 1 of 1954

css.php